Welcome fellow Invisalign Dentists and  Colleagues

I want to introduce you to an exciting way of giving your patients the opportunity to get the smile they want, with less discomfort and more self-assurance than traditional orthodontic treatments. Straighter teeth will offer your patients better health, greater self-confidence, and more respect from others. Invisalign treatments are extremely rewarding as you will see your patient’s attitudes and behaviors transformed through the smile you helped create.

(The following notes have been adapted from a presentation, “Invisialign Smiles with quality and caring” by Dr. David Eshom of San Diego, California.  To find out more about Dr. Eshom and his Invisalign philosophy, find him on the web at www.eshomdds.com )

Today’s Objectives

At the end of this training each individual will be able to:

Answer the Big 5 questions for each patient:

1. What is Invisalign?

2. How does it work?

3. Does it hurt?

4. How long will treatment take?

5. How much does it cost?

Demonstrate knowledge of everything required to implement Invisalign into their everyday practice beginning tomorrow.

1. Why Invisalign is important to your patients?

2. What records need to be produced to begin treatment?

3. How do you schedule appointments?

4. What are the financing options?

5. How do you keep everything organized’?

6. How to promote it inside the practice?

7. Where do I go for more help if needed?

Why Should You Promote Invisalign?

OK, you’ve heard all the hype. Invisalign changes the alignment of your patients’ teeth. So what? Is that really a big deal? I mean, sure they’ll have straighter teeth and a more pleasing smile, but is the “vanity” of a nice smile really important for the majority of my patients?

Group Exercise — Hygienist:

Let’s explore reasons Invisalign can be more important than just a nice smile for most of your patients. In your groups read the information on the following pages and be prepared to report back to the entire class, from your own perspective:

1. What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

2. What does the Patient need to be told?

 

Invisalign Staff Breakout

The Links of Oral Health to Other Medical Issues

We all know that poor oral health can lead to Periodontal Disease. With Invisalign your patient’s teeth are straightened allowing them to more easily take care of their teeth. With straighter teeth, brushing and flossing are easier and more effective, reducing the incidence of periodontal disease.

It has been common knowledge in the dental community for over a decade that Gum Disease is linked to several other medical ailments. These include, but are not limited to, heart disease, respiratory disease, osteoporosis, and even memory.

Heart Disease

Most of the evidence supporting a link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD) comes from epidemiological studies in the late 1980’s. These studies indicated that patients who had a history of myocardial infarction generally had worse oral health. Since then cross-sectional data indicated that patients with severe clinical attachment loss were at greater risk of myocardial infarction than subjects with a healthy periodontium.

Oral infection by periodontal pathogens initiates the formation of dental plaque. This leads to inflammation of periodontal tissues and periodontal pockets thus increasing sub gingival space, which is conducive to bacterial growth. Bacterial release of biologically active molecules may enter the systemic circulation. These products can trigger the host inflammatory response that is thought to contribute to the inflammatory processes leasing to atherosclerosis, the thickening and hardening of arteries produced by a build-up of plaque, the underlying cause of Cardiovascular disease.

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

What does the Patient need to be told?

 

Why Should I Promote Invisalign? (cont)

Respiratory Disease

Studies have indicated that poor oral health could lead to Respiratory Disease and Osteoporosis. According to one article, Periodontal Disease has been linked to an increased risk of respiratory diseases such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Pneumonia is defined as inflammation of the lungs resulting from an infection that is usually bacterial or viral. Nosocomial pneumonia, also called hospital-acquired pneumonia, represents about 15% of hospital-acquired infections. While it only occurs in about ½ of I % of hospitalizations, the mortality rate from this type of pneumonia is about 30%. This type of pneumonia is usually caused by bacteria in the environment. However, several lines of evidence indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for Nosocomial pneumonia. We all know that a higher level of plaque, due to infrequent brushing, or poor oral health care, increases bacterial growth. Further, oral pathogens can be inhaled directly into the lungs. While the immunity mechanisms of the lungs usually prevent infection, if the immune system is suppressed or defective or if an overwhelming number of organisms are aspirated, respiratory disease can develop.

Another respiratory disease linked to poor oral health is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). This disease remains one of the top fifteen causes of death world-wide. Epiderniological studies have revealed a link between periodontal disease and COPD. Patients with a mean attachment loss of at least 2.0 mm were more likely to have COPD than those with less than 2.0 mm. That being said, these results have been in only epidemiological studies; no prospective studies have investigated the link between these diseases.

While further study is needed, it seems clear that there may be a very real link between oral health and the risk of respiratory disease.

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

What does the Patient need to be told?

 

Group Exercise — Front Office:

Let’s explore some of the questions your patients could ask of you. In your groups read the information on the following pages and be prepared to report back to the entire class, from your own perspective:

1. What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

2. What does the Patient need to be told?

So what is Invisalign?

• Invisalign is the invisible way to straighten teeth without braces.

• Using advanced 3-D computer imaging technology to project tooth movement, Invisalign creates a series of clear, custom-made aligners that gradually move the teeth.

The patient wears each aligner for about two weeks, moving to the next set, until the teeth are straight.

Does it work? Is it really effective?

• Yes. It has been proven effective in both clinical research and in private practices throughout North America.

• Pictures of completed cases may be viewed at www.SanDiego-invisalign.com. Click on before and after tab.http://eshomdds.com/services/invisalign.php , http://www.sandiego-invisalign.com/clear_braces/Photos_%26_Video.html

Does Invisalign hurt?

• There may be some mild soreness each time the patient starts a new aligner in the series. This is a normal sign that the aligners are working — sequentially moving

his or her teeth to their final destination.

What does the rest of the staff need to know?

Why Should I Promote Invisalign?

 

Invisalign Staff Breakout

How much does Invisalign cost?

• As with traditional braces, the cost will be based on the complexity of the patient’s case and the length of treatment.

• At our practice the range generally runs from $ ____________ to $

(Cost can be put in context by mentioning any special fee plans that are available, down payment options, the possibility of insurance coverage, or by comparing to traditional braces.)

• Your practice may also have financing options available. If so, make sure you offer those opportunities to your patients.

Does insurance cover Invisalign?

• Typically, an insurance policy that covers traditional braces also covers Invisalign to the same extent.

 

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

What does the Patient need to kto br told?

Why Should I Promote 1nvisaIign? (cont)

Group Exercise — Assistants:

Let’s explore some of the questions your patients could ask of you. In your groups read the information on the following pages and be prepared to report back to the entire class, from your own perspective:

1. What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

2. What does the Patient need to be told?

Why Keep Teeth Straight?

While different studies offer different conclusions, it is clear that straight teeth will help ensure better oral health, as they’re easier to clean and maintain.

Having straight teeth also improves the Temporal Mandibular Joint (TMJ). Aligning the teeth will allow for the proper freedom of movement for the mandible thus helping reduce possible spasms of the joint, pain or discomfort.

The ideal positioning of teeth prior to the placement of implants, bridges, and partials, will help ensure proper spacing, reducing potential future gum disease, maintaining the bone levels around existing teeth, and more.

Having straight teeth also helps reduce the chance of fracturing teeth through ordinary use with improper alignment.

Why Invisalign? What are the benefits?

• They are nearly invisible — a patient can straighten his or her teeth without anyone knowing it.

• They are removable — the patient can still eat and drink as usual with them out.

• Better oral hygiene — the patient will be able to brush and floss as normal to maintain healthy gums and teeth.

• Comfortable — There are no wires, metal or brackets to cause mouth abrasions.

What does the Patient need to be told?

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

 

Invisalign

Staff Breakout

How long does treatment take with Invisalign?

• As with traditional braces, treatment times will vary depending on how much straightening the teeth will need. Nevertheless, in cases completed to date, Invisalign cases finish in less time than conventional braces.

• Only Dr. Eshom can determine the length of the patient’s treatment. (You can give a range based on experience to day. (say X to Y

months.)

How often must I wear the aligners?

• Aligners should be worn day and night, except when eating, brushing, or flossing.

Are there restrictions on eating and drinking?

• No. The aligners are removable, so the patient can still enjoy his or her favorite food and drinks.

Will Invisalign affect my speech?

• Invisalign may temporarily affect the patient’s speech for a day or two, until his or her mouth adjusts to having aligners.

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

What does the Patient need to be told?

Why Should I Promote Invisalign? (cont)

What is the process for getting started with Invisalign?

• The patient needs to schedule an appointment with Dr. Eshom, who can help determine if Invisalign is right for the patient.

• Then Dr. Eshom writes a treatment plan and submits it to Invisalign, along with X-rays, photographs and an impression of the patient’s teeth.

• Using 3-D computer imaging technology to project tooth movement, Invisalign translates the treatment plan into a series of precisely customized aligners.

• The patient wears each aligner for about two weeks, moving to the next set, until the teeth are straight.

• The patient returns for appointments typically once every 2 to 3 weeks. This is the only way Dr. Eshom can be sure that the treatment is progressing as planned.

What does the rest of the Staff need to know?

What does the Patient need to be told?

Invisalign Staff Breakout

Who’s A Candidate?

Will Invisalign work for everyone? Invisalign will work for most people with a wide range of needs, including those whose teeth are too crowded, who have gaps between their teeth, an overbite, a deep bite, or whose teeth may have shifted since wearing braces. Invisalign is for adults and teens whose teeth, including second molars, are fully erupted.

Group Exercise:

In your table groups, determine:

I. Which of the patients below arc candidates for Invisalign?

2. If the patient is a candidate for Invisalign, what would you say to them to introduce Invisalign to them? Make sure you write this down in conversational

tone. Word-for-word, what would you say?